Blogs, Author Platforms, and Connecting (pt 6)

Drstuey at the English language Wikipedia [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

And, we’re back once again to discuss platforming.  So far, it’s mostly been about working on the “backside” of your platform.  Today, we’ve finally built up your original foundation that you are ready to branch out and expand on what you’ve done so far.  There are three key ideas to make this happen.  I’ll try to cover them in a reasonable order, so if it looks like the discussion is going to run long (even for me), I’ll break it up.

Ready to get started?

The first, and easiest way to expand your platform is to reuse content that you’ve been building up on your blog for other areas of the social media platform.  There are many sites that say you “must” do this or you “must” do that.  In some ways, I’ll jump on that bandwagon, and others I’ll say it’s a bunch of hogwash.  About the only “must” you’ll want to develop for yourself is your authenticity.

I know there are bloggers, authors, writers of every stripe and shape who use a screen name or pseudonym for about as many reasons as there are psudonyms.  Do not let the term “authentic” deter you if you are one of this group.  You can still be perfectly authentic, and maintain your anonymity.

For now, we’ll go with the concept of reusing your content.  Yes, I know, I’ve just said that twice in the same screen.  It is because it’s is a good way to get started.

But, how do you reuse your content?

For starters, if you’re on WordPress, and other sites, such as Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, or Facebook, the solution is easy.  Link your accounts together.  You can set it up so there is a two-way information flow, or you can set it up so it is only one way.  For me, since I’m a bit of a glutton for punishment, I’ve set my information flow to flow from the blog out with no return input.  It makes it a little harder to get the engagement from followers, but I follow the concept that the blog is the heart of my platform.  Facebook makes up the blood vessels, and twitter and/or tumblr is the actual blood.  In this circulation model, you don’t want the turbulence from the blood to flow back and interfere with how the heart or blood vessels are functioning.  (I’m still trying to figure out tumblr, and tweet too much to make feeding my twitter feed back to Facebook logical.)

OK, going to back up a second here to that comment about Twitter…

Twitter is a very fast moving platform.  If you don’t have an account, this section may not be important to you.  If you WANT an account, or want to figure out what to do with it, then I highly advise looking through Nat Russo’s blog series Here about twitter.  He’s done an excellent job in breaking down not just how to set up an account, but also some of the basics for that platform.  There is a TON to learn there, so don’t expect to master it overnight.  With the information Nat has published, I’m not going to go into the basics – he’s done it better, and probably much more clearly than I ever could.

However, there is one point I’m going to emphasize now.  If you do feed your blog posts to twitter, and expect them to be seen – you’re going to be disappointed.  Twitter is a constant river of information.  A LOT of information.  I don’t remember the exact number of tweets go out every minute, but I do remember it was huge.  And, your one tweet when your blog post goes out will get drowned out quickly.

Tumblr is similar.  Not quite as fast paced, but still very busy all the time.

For these two planks of your platform, you’ll need to have some strategy to help ensure your posts get seen.  (That goes for all of the social media sights, not just Twitter and Tumblr, but it’s a bit more important for these two.)

The easiest way, and one that can lead to a bad gaff if you’re not careful, is to use one of the third party scheduling apps.  I prefer Hootsuite, but others prefer Buffer, or tweetdeck.  Once again, I advise looking around and investigating the many different options out there before selecting the one that works best for you.

A wonderful friend of mine hosted a guest post for me about how to reuse your blog content for Twitter.  You can find the article over Here on his blog.  For just what to reuse, head on over there.  If you already have an idea of what you want to use, then let’s get to the nuts and bolts of trying to get your content noticed in a good way.

Yes, I deliberately said “in a good way.”  One of the common, and more irritating ways I have run into, ways of getting content noticed is for the author of the tweet to use the same tweet, or some close variation of it, over and over again in a small time frame.  If you are working on a deadline for a release, or campaign, I can understand doing this.  It is a short term, short duration “spam” activity.  It can generate some results, but don’t expect them to be over the top.  Often, if someone starts doing this, and it goes on longer than a couple of hours, that person will either be muted (if they are lucky) or unfollowed.  That is not what you are trying to accomplish.

While being unfollowed on Twitter does not have the same impact as it does on Facebook, it does mean there is one less person you are reaching, and one less potential reader you can engage with.

Using the third party apps to schedule your tweets can lead to this occurring, and is one of the biggest reasons why many would strongly suggest not using them.  However, I believe that most, if not all of you reading this, have day jobs, or other things in life that pull you away from Twitter.  And, keeping your name in the feed is always a good thing.  You just want the attention you are receiving to be positive as well.    So, when you set up your schedule, you have to answer the same questions for Twitter you answered about your posts – how often do you want your content to go out?  How much content do you want to go out?  And, how long do you want to “work” your presence in the stream of consciousness that makes up your followers Twitter feeds?  These answers are important, as they will help define how you set up your schedule.

Since I keep an active schedule on the blog, posting a new post for each of my daily series, I want those posts to be seen.  That means I’ll have to have a minimum of 7 posts per day for each of them.  I choose to run a week behind on when my Twitter schedule picks up the posts to ensure that I have active links to use in the tweets themselves.  I don’t want to risk scheduling a post that hasn’t gone live, and generating a “dead” link for a few tweets – you never know for certain who is going to click on that link and follow it back to your blog post.

And, since just one post will tend to get drowned out in the feed, even if I just posted my seven tweets, I’ll get some exposure, but probably not enough.  I like to run three tweets per day for each of the posts.  That’s 21 tweets to set up for each day.  Since my following is world-wide, I want to make sure everyone has a chance to see the entire set.  Again, I recognize that as readers, not everyone is able to hang out on Twitter all day, or even for the same time every day.  And, so I have a staggered schedule.  I am “on the air” for twenty two hours a day, seven days a week.  When I set up the schedule, I start at 2 AM local, and run until 10 PM local.  That’s a LOT of tweets!

Here’s where the savvy comes into play.  Remember I said I have a staggered schedule?  Here’s what I mean:

Sunday I’ll start at 2 AM with the first tweet of the week.  It’s always the author interview I hosted the week before.  Every hour, I’ll move to the next series – character interviews, the behind the scene posts, the platforming post, a piece of my original work (poem, short story, flash fiction), A book review, and a filler piece to make a total of 7.  The filler usually is an extra book review or second character interview, though I’ve also used a second piece of original work for the slot as well.

Monday starts at 2 AM with the character interview and ends the rotation with the author interview.

Each day will start with the next series in the week, so that each day has a different post series to start the day off.  I then fill in the rest of the schedule in rotation.  It’s a pain in the backside to do in Hootsuite if you’re scheduling each post individually.  There is a work around, however.  I’ve had a few people ask me about it, so here’s the cheat sheet version:

  • Open Hootsuite
  • Go into the scheduler tab (left hand side, the little arrow that says “publisher”)
  • Go to “Past Scheduled” – this should come up with an over view of the current week.  If not, in the upper right hand corner, click on “week” to get this calendar view.
  • Have your selected tweets in a separate program.  I prefer Word, because I like tables.  I’ve also used Notepad and tried to use Excel (Excel didn’t work out too well)
  • If your monitor is big enough, shrink your browser window to just over half the screen so you can have your other document beside it.
  • Start copy/pasting your tweets into the days/times you want them to go out.  The trick is to work a week in advance.  Since Hootsuite starts their week on Sunday, you’ll want to double check the dates.  You CAN work in the current week – I’ve done it – but if you make a mistake everything you’ve copied will vanish when you correct the tweet.  Handy if you’re assembling a super-busy tweet schedule – because you have a fresh canvas just by advancing to the next week, and then coming back to the current one.
  • When you’re done scheduling, head over to the home screen (little house icon with “streams” beside it), and take some time to interact with your the various feeds you’ve set up.

I tend to work in tweetdeck for the interactions, since Hootsuite is delayed quite a bit.  But, I prefer Hootsuite for the scheduling, especially now that they’ve figured out how to enable you to attach images to your tweets.

You can also connect your Facebook, Google +, LinkedIn, and Instagram accounts, though if you are using the free version, you can only link 3 profiles.  Each profile also has it’s own fresh page for the schedule, so if you want to set up a series of scheduled posts for the other social media platforms, you can.  I prefer to have a little more personal control over my Facebook, so just focus on scheduling for Twitter.

 

Seeing as this is heading into super-long territory, I’m going to let you go for this week.  Feel free to experiment with what I’ve mentioned, and if you are so inclined, leave a comment below about what worked or didn’t work for you.  I’m always learning, so the way I’ve presented may be flawed, or you may find a way that works better.

Happy blogging!

 

If you’ve missed the previous installment of the series, you can find it Here and the entire series Here

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