Blogs, Author Platforms, and Connecting (pt 5)

By JeffreyVromant (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

We’ve been talking about keeping your posts organized.  When you were setting up your blog, you made the decision about what types of posts you’d be making, how often you’d be posting, and where you’d be feeding the posts through to.  If you have an active blog, like I do, there will come a time when you need to start organizing the posts for others to find them.  And, tables are my preferred way.

There are several negatives to using tables, the biggest of which is that it puts another layer of choices between your potential reader and the information you hope they find.  If you are using your blog as a sale point, this can seriously impact your sales.  Recently I came across a statistic that every time you add a choice, you lose somewhere in the neighborhood of 90% of your readers.  That is a rather substantial loss for anyone.  Before you decide to add in a list, table, or other selection point, you do need to take that loss of viewers into account.  Maintaining the tables can also be a big time hog, and so may not be a good option  – even if your posts, post series, or post material are a good candidate for the table format.

The positives for me, however, outweigh that negative.  Because I have so many posts, and I want them to be accessible all the time without anyone having to scroll, and scroll, and scroll, or search and search (hoping they hit the right search string).  The way I set up my tables lets me do that.  Depending on your blog’s theme, adding in tables may be an easy process, or it could take a LOT of work to make them look just right.

I won’t go into how to code the tables, though I’d be glad to discuss it should there be enough interest.  There are several wonderful HTML coding references on the web you can find with a quick Google search.  I’m going to stay on track for how to connect with your readers, future readers, and anyone else who comes across your blog.  (I hope.)

The only reason I bring up organization, is because there are some blogs that unless you know exactly what you are looking for, you will never find it.  And others are so easy to navigate that finding that tidbit of information you need right now falls right into your hand.  Organization is how that comes about.  That doesn’t mean the information you’re posting shouldn’t be engaging (which is a whole other subject I’m still figuring out), but it does mean the content you’re posting can be found easily.

When you are organizing your posts into some type of selection category – either through menus, tables, charts, word clouds, or what ever, you need to make sure the selection options are understandable and relevant.  In a way, this ties back with tagging your posts.  It would make no sense to post a book review under “interviews”, if the interview is the main focus of your post.  Even if there is an interview that is part of the post, not everyone will know that the first time they look for it.  It is acceptable to organize the dual-purpose post under both selection criteria, however.  It allows people to find it either way.  And that is part of making your content accessible.

And that brings me to the last point of this piece of the platforming story.

When you are posting, you CAN choose to have a post serve many purposes.  An example is when I host tour posts for T.J.’s Virtual Tours.  Most often, those posts have a bit about the author, some type of mini-interview, and either a group of reviews, or examples from the book that’s being toured.  A lot depends on what type of tour I’m participating in.  And, it is also a cross connection to other blogs, which helps with overall discoverability for me.

That is a lot of what platforming is – it’s getting yourself discovered.  And, having your content organized so others can access it easily makes that process a little easier.

I think I’ve dropped enough big pieces of information for you to think about for one post.  So, I’ll let you think, and see about following my own recommendations.  There’s a lot of content hidden around my blog, and while some of it I’m keeping “off the radar”, I need to do some maintenance so the rest of it can be found.  Happy platforming, and we’ll see you next time when I’ll dive into the concept of how your blog content can be used to expand your platform.

If you’ve missed the previous installment of the series, you can find it Here and the entire series Here

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5 thoughts on “Blogs, Author Platforms, and Connecting (pt 5)

    • With the current changes in most of the programs I’ve seen – no. I’m struggling to find a replacement for Hootsuite since they changed from the much higher schedule cap to the current one of 10 per week.

      The biggest reason I’d recommend anyone to schedule on the really active platforms (like Twitter) is to help catch followers who are on the other side of the globe. That way you can get some sleep, and they can try to keep up with any new news you may have.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hmm okay I can understand that. I’ve actually started targeting people on other side of the globe by posting between 9-10 PM. It’s surprising how much of a response I get!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Depending on if you’re in Europe or the US, there’s a huge market across the pond. And, then there’s Australia that’s about 1/2 between the two (time wise) depending on which way you’re traveling.

          Prescheduling also will depend on how active your blog is (and what content you want to get out) – I freely admit my schedule’s insane when I’m able to keep it full. Most of that’s content, not promo, so I want to get it out in order to hide a promo or two in the mix on Twitter.

          This is a choice I made once I started focusing on working on my author’s platform. Others may not need the same type of hyperactivity to get the same results. (And I also freely admit, I’m jealous of that end of the spectrum!)

          However, even if you’re tweeting/posting at a slower rate, having a reliable schedule when your content goes out will still boost your visibility. People get to know when you post, so they start looking for it about that time.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Well, good to know. I guess I’m worried that I wouldn’t be able to keep a schedule full; that seems like a lot of work!

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